Nichels Engineering LaDow Publishing

Mopar Action Four - Page 1 -BWEn

Mopar Action Four - Page 2 -BWEnMopar Action Four - Page 3 -BWEnMopar Action Four - Page 4 -BWEnMopar Action Four - Page 5 -BWEn

A ribbon-cutting ceremony, held earlier today, marked the opening of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Solar Farm located adjacent to the backstretch of the famed IMS 2.5-mile oval.

Solar Farm by Air

The IMS Solar Farm is the largest solar farm at any sporting facility in the world and features a total of 39,312 solar modules that generate 9.0 megawatts of power, which is equal to offsetting 10,288 tons of carbon annually. IMS used a portion of its 1,000 acre campus that was under-utilized and without a specific development plan.

SunWize Technologies, Inc., of San Jose, Calif., and Phoenix-based Blue Renewable Energy, co-developed the project. Blue Renewable Energy entered into a land-lease agreement with IMS to build the system on the property. The system was designed, engineered and installed by SunWize Technologies. Clenera and Swinerton Builders finalized the engineering and constructed the project on behalf of Centaurus Renewable Energy. Indianapolis Power & Light Company (IPL), an AES Company, is the system off-taker under the terms of a Power Purchase Agreement and will own the Solar Renewable Energy Credits (SRECs) produced by the solar power system.

solar panel b“In 1909, the Indianapolis Motor Speedway was constructed in part to help advance the automotive industry, which at that time was the new technology of the day,” said J. Douglas Boles, Indianapolis Motor Speedway president. “Today, IMS is honored to be part of a partnership with IPL, SunWize and Blue Renewable Energy where innovation and technology are coming together to bring diversification of generation resources to this community.  The unused land at the IMS property just east of the race track has been transformed into a solar energy production facility that will provide an alternative source of energy to IPL customers.”

“Solar generation is an important component of IPL’s commitment to developing renewable generation resources,” said Ken Zagzebski, President of AES’ U.S. Strategic Business Unit, parent company of IPL. “The new IMS solar farm will be a constant reminder to those who visit the largest spectator sporting facility in the world of the creative solutions taking place here in Indianapolis to increase sustainability.”

“For over 100 years, the iconic IMS has broken its share of records. Now SunWize is honored to be part of the development and execution of this record-breaking solar project, the largest solar power system in the sporting world,” said Scott Tonn, Principal and Managing Director of Tonn Investments, an investor of SunWize Technologies. 

Indianapolis Motor Speedway Solar Farm Facts and Figures:

Total area of land parcel on which the solar farm is built: 68 acres

Net land area occupied by solar panels: 41.5 acres

Quantity of individual 48” x 72” photovoltaic solar panels: 39,314

Area of solar panels: 21.66 acres

Based on 1100 kWh per household per month, number of homes for which the solar farm has the ability to meet the energy needs: 1,000 homes

Approximate quantity of power produced by one 48” by 72” solar panel: 230 watts, which can power any of these items:
- Small appliance
- LCD television
- Window fan
- Electric blanket
- Desktop computer

2014 ticket information: Ticket information is available for the remaining events in 2014 at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway – the Kroger Super Weekend at the Brickyard and the Red Bull Indianapolis GP.

Fans can order tickets at www.ims.com/tickets, by calling 800-822-INDY or 317-492-6700 between 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. (ET) Monday through Friday or by visiting the Ticket Office at the IMS Administration Building at the corner of Georgetown Road and 16th Street between 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. (ET) Monday through Friday.

Tickets for groups of 20 or more also are available. Contact the IMS Group Sales Department at (866) 221-8775 for more information

Data and Graphics provided Courtesy of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway

STORY

The second generation scoring pylon on the main straightaway of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway was taken down this afternoon to make way for a new and improved version of one of the “Racing Capital of the World’s” most iconic symbols. 

The scoring pylon that was removed today, located just south of the entrance to Gasoline Alley, was erected in 1994. It replaced the original IMS scoring pylon built in the spring of 1959.

The new scoring pylon will feature full LED panels on all four sides providing improved messaging capabilities to fans that will include animation and video.

“The pylon is part of the tradition of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway and that’s why we want the new one to look pretty similar,” said J. Douglas Boles, Indianapolis Motor Speedway president. “It’s going to be basically the same width and height, so what we’re used to seeing here will be there in the middle. It’s time to upgrade to a pylon that folks can see from further away and will give us video capabilities that we haven’t seen in the past. It’ll still feel like the old one, just a tick taller and about three inches wider, so it’s really going to look pretty similar to this one, but it’ll have video capability.

“We’re trying to take all the information that we can gather and send it to our fans in the seats. We think this is a lot better way to deliver information to our fans and we can actually make the numbers a little bit bigger so that they can be seen from Turn 1 and Turn 4. The top will be able to really show the drivers when we go yellow. Right now, if you think about the old pylon, it just had those two rotating yellow lights, so this will have a yellow ribbon at the top that’ll flash, allowing drivers to see from a long distance away when the track goes yellow as well.”

Construction on the third version of the IMS scoring pylon is scheduled to begin early next week and is expected to be completed in time for the Kroger Super Weekend. 

Mopar Action - Part 8 - 2oct2014indexoct2014

Mopar Action - Part 7 - 1 Mopar Action - Part 7 - 2 Mopar Action - Part 7 - 3 Mopar Action - Part 7 - 4 Mopar Action - Part 7 - 5 Mopar Action - Part 7 - 6 Mopar Action - Part 7 - 7

3

INDIANAPOLIS, Monday, May 26, 2014 – Ryan Hunter-Reay earned $2,491,194 from an overall purse of $14,231,760 for his victory Sunday, May 25 in the 98th Running of the Indianapolis 500 Mile Race.

Hunter-Reay held off Helio Castroneves by only .0600 of a second — the second-closest margin of victory in the history of the event — in a six-lap duel to claim his first Indy 500 victory. Hunter-Reay is the first American to win “The Greatest Spectacle in Racing” since Sam Hornish Jr. in 2006.

04CJ3398There were 34 lead changes among 11 drivers in the fast-paced 200-lap event (186.563 mph average), with Hunter-Reay topping all other drivers by leading nine times for 56 laps after starting 19th in his No. 28 Andretti Autosport DHL Honda. The last time a driver led the most laps of the race from a lower starting position was in 1975 when Wally Dallenbach led a race high 96 laps after starting from the 21st position.

A resident of Fort Lauderdale, Fla., Hunter-Reay took the lead for good from Castroneves on Lap 199 and recorded a 220.927 mph final lap to Castroneves’ 220.729 mph, keeping the Brazilian from joining A.J. Foyt, Al Unser and Rick Mears as the only four time winners of the event.

Castroneves earned $785,194 in driving his No. 3 Pennzoil Ultra Platinum Team Penske Chevrolet to a runner-up finish for the second time in his career, matching his performance from 2003.

May 25, 2014Walt KuhnHunter-Reay’s Andretti Autosport teammate Marco Andretti drove his No. 25 Snapple Honda to his third, third-place finish in nine Indianapolis 500 starts. Andretti led the race three times for 20 laps and received $585,194.

Last year’s Indianapolis 500 runner-up and Rookie of the Year Carlos Munoz had another strong performance in driving his No. 25 Cinsay AndrettiTV.com HVM Honda to a fourth-place finish after starting the race seventh. He received a check for $449,194.

Juan Pablo Montoya returned to the Indianapolis 500 for the first time since winning his only other start in 2000, and finished fifth in his No. 2 Verizon Team Penske Chevrolet after starting tenth. Montoya led the race three times for a total of 16 laps and was awarded $441,944.

In the first Verizon IndyCar Series race of his career, NASCAR star Kurt Busch started 12th and finished sixth in his No. 26 Andretti Autosport Suretone Honda. Busch was voted the winner of the prestigious Sunoco Indianapolis 500 Rookie of the Year Award and was presented with $423,889, which included a $25,000 bonus from Sunoco.

5Also turning in an impressive rookie performance was Sage Karam, a 19-year-old rookie from Nazareth, Pa., who started 31st and finished ninth in the No. 22 Comfort Revolution/Brantley Gilbert Chevrolet, earning $270,305.

Pole sitter Ed Carpenter, who led the race four times for 26 laps in his Fuzzy’s Vodka/Ed Carpenter Racing Chevrolet, finished 27th after a crash ended his day on lap 176. Carpenter received $463,694, which included $100,000 for earning the Verizon P1 Award as pole winner for the second consecutive year.

The Indianapolis 500 Mile Race Purse consists of Indianapolis Motor Speedway and Verizon IndyCar Series awards, plus other designated and special awards. Purse awards were announced and presented at the Victory Awards Celebration presented by Ice Miller Legal Counsel, Contour Hardening, Inc. and Allied Solutions on Monday, May 26 at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

The 99th Running of the Indianapolis 500 Mile Race is scheduled for Sunday, May 24, 2015.

4

Photos and Data Courtesy of The Indianapolis Motor Speedway and IndyCar

1972_Jim_Nabors

By: Jeff Majeske 

Special Correspondent to SpeedwaySightings.com 

Jim Nabors has been singing “Back Home Again in Indiana” literally for as long as I can remember.

His first performance was in 1972 – the first year I’m sure I was at the track (I might’ve gone in 1971) – and came about by accident.

Tony Hulman, perhaps on a whim, asked Nabors if he wanted “to do the song.” Nabors accepted, thinking the Speedway savior meant “The Star-Spangled Banner.”

The photo above is from Nabors’ performance in 1972. I love everything about it – his checkered coat, the cravat, the ladder, the ridiculously large credential and backup holder, and the piece of paper that presumably has the lyrics.

This year’s performance will be Nabors’ last.

“The first time that I ever sang at the Indy 500 in 1972, the warmth I got from the crowd immediately made me become a lifetime Hoosier; and I’ve always cherished it,” Nabors said in a news release issued in March. “I’ll see you all in May, but I’ve come to the conclusion that my health doesn’t permit me to travel very much anymore. So I’ll be retiring from singing ‘Back Home Again’ at the Indy 500 after this year.”

If you grew up in Indiana, particularly Indianapolis, the song has special meaning, and it’s hard not to get a little choked up when Nabors sings.

I sing it each time I cross into Indiana from Michigan, which causes the other passengers to get choked up as well. (OK; it’s more like gagging; I guess I’m not quite as good a singer as Jim Nabors.)

The forecast for race day looks excellent; let’s hope it holds. And let’s hope Mr. Nabors is in fine voice one more time.

Did you know?

• Nabors, 83, has performed at the Indianapolis 500 every year since 1987 with the exception of 2007 and 2012 races that he missed due to illness

• Has performed the song 34 times in person at Indianapolis Motor Speedway

• Always accompanied by the Purdue “All American” Marching Band

Photo credit: Indianapolis Motor Speedway