Robbie

— Photo credit: Indianapolis Motor Speedway —

Indianapolis 500 Insights

By: Jeff Majeski — Jeff’s Indy Talk

— 30 Days in May — Day 24 —

No. 24 — Robbie Buhl — 2001 Purex G Force/Infiniti

Buhl was one of the drivers who benefited from the infamous split in open-wheel racing.

The former Indy Lights champion (1992) had trouble finding a ride in CART, but the arrival of the Indy Racing League in 1996 provided an opportunity.

He had success with both John Menard and Dreyer & Reinbold, winning a race for each.

Buhl’s Purex machine was one of the more striking liveries of that era.

In 2001, he started ninth and finished 15th in the 500.

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floys

— Indianapolis Motor Speedway photo —

Indianapolis 500 Insights

By: Jeff Majeski — Jeff’s Indy Talk

— 30 Days in May — Day 23 —

No. 23 — Floyd Roberts — 1938 Burd Piston Ring Special Wetteroth/Miller

The first Indianapolis 500 program I got was from the 1973 race.

I would spend time poring over its contents, absorbing various facts and figures about the race – sort of a 5-year-old Donald Davidson.

Of particular interest to me was Wilbur Shaw’s success from 1937-40. (The summary for each of these races was listed on one page.)

I noticed that had it not been for Floyd Roberts winning in 1938 that Shaw would’ve won the 500 four times in a row.

At this time, A.J. Foyt was trying to become the first four-time winner, a feat he finally achieved in 1977.

Anyway, Roberts beat Shaw by a wide margin (more than four minutes), but Shaw, so vital in helping the Speedway survive after World War II, won in 1939 and 1940 to become the first back-to-back winner.

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tony

Photo credit: Indianapolis Motor Speedway

Indianapolis 500 Insights

By: Jeff Majeski — Jeff’s Indy Talk

— 30 Days in May — Day 22 —

No. 22 — Tony Stewart –1999 The Home Depot Dallara/Oldsmobile

Stewart was the first homegrown star of the Indy Racing League.

His pedigree was Hollywood-perfect: An Indiana native who won national titles in Midgets, Sprints and Silver Crown (all in the same season!) who proved immediately adept at driving Indy cars, too.

Alas, Stewart instead decided instead to pursue a full-time career in NASCAR. He was fast right off the bat in stock cars, too, and finished his NASCAR career with three Cup titles and two wins in the Brickyard 400.

In the 1999 Indianapolis 500, Stewart finished 9th, four laps down to winner Kenny Brack.

But Stewart’s workday was just beginning, because he flew from Indianapolis to Charlotte, N.C., to compete in the 600-mile NASCAR race that night and finished an impressive fourth.

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cale_edited

Indianapolis 500 Insights

By: Jeff Majeski — Jeff’s Indy Talk

— 30 Days in May — Day 21 —

No. 21 — Cale Yarborough — 1971 Gene White Firestone Mongoose/Ford

A three-time consecutive Cup champion and four-time Daytona 500 winner, Yarborough was a legendary driver in NASCAR.

For the 1971 season, however, he found himself “between manufacturers” on the stock-car circuit, so Yarborough basically ended up being a full-time Championship (IndyCar) division shoe in USAC.

He finished 16th in the point standings in 1971, with a pair of fifth-place finishes (at the first Trenton race and at Michigan) his best results.

At Indianapolis, Yarborough started 14th and finished 16th, retiring with a cam failure after 140 laps.

He made the last of his four Indianapolis starts in 1972, when he finished 10th.

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dixon.jpg

INDIANAPOLIS (Friday, May 25, 2018) – The highly anticipated documentary on four-time Verizon IndyCar Series champion Scott Dixon, “Born Racer,” scheduled for release later this year, unveiled its teaser trailer today at Indianapolis Motor Speedway ahead of the 102nd Indianapolis 500 presented by PennGrade Motor Oil.

“Born Racer” is the powerful and inspirational story of dedication, danger, fear and the rare will to defy all personal limitations that Dixon demonstrated in his successful IndyCcar career. The 2008 Indianapolis 500 champion ranks 4th in all-time IndyCar victories with 41 – one behind 3rd-place Michael Andretti. The 37-year-old New Zealander will start Sunday’s Indy 500 from the outside of Row 3.

Along with his wife, Emma, and team owner Chip Ganassi, Dixon debuted the documentary trailer for media attending “The Greatest Spectacle in Racing” this weekend.

“‘Born Racer’ is a big milestone for me personally, so I couldn’t think of a better place to launch the teaser trailer than the Indianapolis 500,” Dixon said. “It’s strange seeing yourself on the big screen, but also rather exciting. I hope it will give people a real insight, not only into the cars and the drivers, but the entire racing community and the huge amount of work that goes into making this all happen.”

Co-produced by Universal Pictures Home Entertainment Content Group and GFC Films, “Born Racer” was filmed last year with an all-access lens, following Dixon and the Chip Ganassi Racing team to Verizon IndyCar Series races and the 24 Hours of Le Mans. It also delved into the personal lives of the Dixon family.

The film was directed by Bryn Evans and produced by Matthew Metcalfe and Fraser Brown. Metcalfe produced the popular “McLaren” documentary that premiered last year.

For more information on “Born Racer,” visit BornRacerMovie.com or contact: Charlotte Jordan, Publicity Manager, Acquisitions for Universal Pictures International & UK (Charlotte.jordan@nbcuni.com); or Kelly Walker, Publicity Director, Acquisitions, Universal Pictures International & UK (Kelly.walker@nbcuni.com).

… from IndyCar.com

Humans of Racing Master

The Humans of Racing Series was created by Kaaveh Akbari to be a social media presence to tell the stories about the people not necessarily seen in the limelight in the motorsports industry. Having stepped away from the industry almost 10 years ago, Kaaveh realized what he missed the most was the people that he had  worked with. There are many fascinating people in this industry, and his hope is to tell you as many of their stories as possible. This from Kaaveh Akbari

We spent some time getting to know Andretti Autosport’s Jeremy Milless – Race Engineer for the #27 Alexander Rossi NAPA Autoparts Honda

Jeremy doesn’t hit the mold of a traditional race engineer, but he and Alexander started hitting their stride together in the second half of the 2017 season, with a victory at Watkins Glen.

This duo has to be seen as a championship contender for 2018.

We had a great time speaking to both, and it’s obvious in this video that the two share an awesome working relationship.